Our Learning Model

The Elevated Achievement Learning Model is driven by the learner and answers the question—What does a learner need to know in order to better own his learning? The Learning Model is made up of five phases: setting the Learning Context, stating the Learning Outcome, engaging in the Learning Process, producing the Learning Demonstration, and implementing the Learning Application.

Remember the more students know about their learning, the more opportunity they have to own their learning. The learning model phases help answer the following questions for the student:

  • Why am I learning this?
  • What will I learn?
  • How will I learn this?
  • How will I show what I have learned?
  • How will I continue to use what I have learned?

Teacher:  Why is the learning important?
Student:  Why am I learning this?

This is the phase where the lesson is introduced to students and is placed within a context. Context includes informing students about what they will learn in this lesson, why it is important and how it connects to previous and future learning. In Learning Context teachers ensure that students understand how this lesson will help them with the culminating application of learning at the end of the Unit or Course. Teacher delivery and explanation are central to this phase; however students should be given ample opportunity to demonstrate that they understand the focus of the lesson and are clear about how they will use their learning at the end of the lesson.

During this phase the teacher specifically introduces what students will be learning, why it is important to learn, how this learning connects to previous learnings, and how they will apply what they have learned in the future.

Teacher:  What will my students learn?
Student:  What will I learn?

During the Learning Outcome phase the teacher specifically introduces what students will be learning (skill/standard) during the Learning Process phase and how they will demonstrate their learning (product) during the Learning Demonstration phase. This phase of the lesson can be developed in a very open-ended or a tightly structured way. In either case the teacher may be connecting students to prior learning or they may be building background during this phase of the lesson.

Teacher:  How will my students learn it?
Student:  How will I learn this?

This is the phase of the lesson where students are actively engaged in learning the content or skills required by the standard and/or learning outcome. During this phase, the teacher will introduce the lesson and will inform students about the way in which they will be learning the content or skill.

Instruction needs to be flexible and fluid. There is not one delivery system that will work for every standard or learning outcome. For example, when learning a process—making an inference or problem solving—the delivery method can be much more open-ended. When learning a discrete skill—grammar rules or mathematical computation—the delivery method can be more highly structured. In either case, the teacher must determine which method will better support the learning of the students. This phase of the lesson can be orchestrated in a very open-ended or a tightly structured way.

Planning for this phase includes identifying a Learning Process that will cement student learning of the identified student outcome. This planning will help the teacher decide whether to use a more open-ended approach or a more tightly structured approach. In order for this phase to be successful students must be given ample opportunities to actively engage in the content, whether in a small group context or during whole group instruction. Teachers need to plan for how they will participate in the lesson, either as a model, as a direct facilitator, or as a monitor that provides specific feedback to keep the process on track. Once the approach is identified, the teacher must carefully plan how to introduce the Learning Process to students and how she or he will check for student understanding during the process. If the process requires students to connect to previous learning, the teacher must plan how these connections will be made. If the process requires specific background knowledge, the teacher must plan how students will have the background necessary to complete the Learning Process. Central to planning is making sure that students are clear how they will demonstrate their learning at the end of the lesson and or unit. Additionally, teachers must decide what behavioral norms and routines are needed for this phase of the lesson to be successful.

Teacher:  How will my students show that they have learned it?
Student:  How will I show what I have learned?

This is the phase of the lesson where students produce work that shows they can perform the skill or process independently and accurately. In the open-ended approach, students will demonstrate their learning by showing how they solved the problem or completed the open-ended process, or developed a product to match the given criteria. In the case of the more structured approach, the student should be able to accurately and independently replicate the same process or procedure or action that the teacher modeled during the Learning Process phase.  Planning for this phase includes identifying what successful learning looks like and describing the learning to the students in written or verbal form.

Teacher:  How will my students continue to use this learning?
Student:  How will I continue to use what I learned?

This phase of the learning connects previous and current learning to subsequent learning as students retain the skill or process for future use, apply the skill or process in a variety of ways, and transfer the skill or content into other situations. Teachers will need to plan student opportunities during which they can apply this learning in a variety of ways. Students must also be allowed to reflect on their learning and growth as they develop stronger metacognitive skills.